Tips For Finding Jobs In Music In Your Hometown

December 23rd, 2009
gregory van duyse asked:


ou live in a small town in the middle of nowhere, it still may be possible to find jobs in music and not have to move out of your home. Some people have a hard time being creative and doing research on the best places for jobs in music. If you live in a small town or just think that there are no jobs in music where you live, here are some ideas to get you started. Check your phone book or the local yellow pages for the nearest big city. If it is only a half hour to an hour away, it may be of your interest to find a job in the music industry there. It may be a long commute, but if you really have a passion for music, you will do it. Also, some music jobs can be worked from home some days of the week as this may be an option as well for you. Look up different music industry places such as recording studios, theaters, record labels, music stores, and advertising and public relation agencies that deal with music and entertainment. The type of job that you pursue depends on what you want to do in music. Your little town or suburb may be bigger than you think when it comes to jobs in music. Is there a local bar or pub that frequent books live entertainment? Could they use a booking agent or can you talk to some of the local bands that play there to be their representative or agent? Do you have a local theater that puts on plays or musicals? What about your local high school: do they need a choir, orchestra or theater instructor? Finding jobs in music is possible in just about any place; you just have to know where to look and get creative. You also have to learn how to sell yourself and you may just be making up your own job in the music industry in your hometown.

Tips For Finding Jobs In Music In Your Hometown

December 22nd, 2009
Paul Shellem asked:


Even if you live in a small town in the middle of nowhere, it still may be possible to find jobs in music and not have to move out of your home. Some people have a hard time being creative and doing research on the best places for jobs in music. If you live in a small town or just think that there are no jobs in music where you live, here are some ideas to get you started.

Check your phone book or the local yellow pages for the nearest big city. If it is only a half hour to an hour away, it may be of your interest to find a job in the music industry there. It may be a long commute, but if you really have a passion for music, you will do it. Also, some music jobs can be worked from home some days of the week as this may be an option as well for you. Look up different music industry places such as recording studios, theaters, record labels, music stores, and advertising and public relation agencies that deal with music and entertainment. The type of job that you pursue depends on what you want to do in music.

Your little town or suburb may be bigger than you think when it comes to jobs in music. Is there a local bar or pub that frequent books live entertainment? Could they use a booking agent or can you talk to some of the local bands that play there to be their representative or agent? Do you have a local theater that puts on plays or musicals? What about your local high school: do they need a choir, orchestra or theater instructor?

Finding jobs in music is possible in just about any place; you just have to know where to look and get creative. You also have to learn how to sell yourself and you may just be making up your own job in the music industry in your hometown.

For More Details Visit: http://www.careersinmusichelp.com/



Tim Young, Bringing New York Rock’n'roll Back to Its Roots

December 22nd, 2009
Eric de Fontenay asked:


Rocker Tim Young is a veteran to the New York music scene. Influenced over the years by artists of all styles from Marvin Gaye to Jefferson Airplane to Elvis Presley, Young has been writing music for nearly two decades now. He started releasing albums in 2002 with No Stranger, a collection of nine original instrumentals that were self-produced and recorded at his home studio. His 2005 album, Red, was his debut as a singer/songwriter, and now in 2008 he has released his newest album, The Cost, that is a straight up rock ‘n roll record. MusicDish had the chance to speak with Tim in this exclusive interview about his new album, his influences, his future and other related topics.

[MusicDish] When did you begin creating music, and when did you begin to seriously pursue a music career?

[Tim Young] I was a junior at Mansfield State University in Mansfield, PA. Actually, I had accordion lessons when I was a kid from eleven years to fifteen. But at Mansfield I began to write my own songs. Then I was nineteen. Peter, Paul and Mary were the easy ones to pick up then and everybody loved them.

Once I put my first band together, which was the early 80’s, I became serious about my music. My first band, just for the record, was named Signals. Unfortunately there are no recordings of this music. Or maybe that’s a good thing. I did always think I’ve got a bunch of hits in me.

[MusicDish] What were your earliest musical influences?

[Tim Young] Probably Elvis and Elvis clones like Fabian and Bobby Rydell. There was also this guy Buddy Knox who had this record, ‘Party Doll’, which I loved. The Beatles hit when I was fourteen and that was the heyday of great AM radio which was always on the instant I stepped foot into the family car. After I earned my driver’s license and could drive on my own, I would drive as fast as the music would take me and turn it way up. I remember Tommy James’s ‘Hanky Panky’ and Arthur Connolly’s ‘Sweet Soul Music’ being particularly great to drive fast to.

[MusicDish] Do you find that songwriting or lyric writing comes most naturally to you?

[Tim Young] I think they both come naturally to me but both are difficult to get right. I began writing some poetry in high school but I didn’t play guitar then. However, I was encouraged by a few fellow students to go on with my writing. I guess melodies did come kind of easy for me once I had mastered a few chords. It was and still is so fascinating to see and hear the words take on a new life in the context of the music. Plus I had memorized every lyric and melody nuance to every Beatles song that was released. I poured that stuff into my head. I know that helped me in many ways.

The late 60’s and early 70’s brought the counterculture to a head. I mean there was a lot in the air then that one could take to support the habit of writing music and putting words to it. It seemed there was always something that needed to be said. And for me the longer I kept writing the better I became.

[MusicDish] What music do you currently listen to?

[Tim Young] Mostly my own stuff. When I’ve completed a new project I get so much satisfaction in hearing it. It’s like food. I need it to sustain myself. I also listen to artists I find on MySpace and other places I stumble onto on the web. I should probably branch out more with my listening but mostly I’m just disappointed. However, right now I am also pretty hot on Patti Smith after just seeing the brand new doc on her life, which was an excellent film.

[MusicDish] As I listen to ‘The Cost,’ I am clearly reminded of the twangy blues of Elvis, combined with the overwhelming vibe of heartbreak, mastered by Johnny Cash. Would you consider your music to be modeled after them?

[Tim Young] Not consciously. But Johnny Cash is someone I look up to because he was more of a writer than Elvis, and in the past few years before his death, Cash was really reborn again. It’s no secret. Just listen to those last few albums. Stellar performances, in my opinion. And even though he did cover a lot of songs, if you didn’t know you would probably think that Johnny wrote them. That’s the kind of artist I can aspire to. It seems to me that his music was not a part of his life but was his life and in that respect I guess you could say I have modeled myself after Johnny Cash. I also dig the wearing of the black.

[MusicDish] What do you feel is the overall message of your album? Do the themes of pain and loss correspond with personal experiences, and do you feel that the album can serve as therapy for those who also experience similar situations?

[Tim Young] I don’t know if there is a message, but it seems to me as the good stuff and bad stuff comes along it’s better to deal with it somehow rather than sweeping it under the rug. If you lose someone dear to you then howl about it. When things get ugly, move away from them. The individual is responsible for him(her)self. It’s too easy to blame somebody else. When things are great, celebrate. It’s so much more wise, I think, to roll with the punches. Have fun. Not having fun? Get drunk.

I’d have to say that almost all my songs are pretty personal. They all trigger a personal response in me that no one else would know about. I think that happens to everyone - an individual response that lives in the mind. On the other hand, there can be a more shared response between people and that’s what makes a song resonate and become popular. The sharing of the emotions the music allows to come through. There is real power in those kinds of emotional reactions.

I’m certainly no therapist, but I know from experience that the right song at the right moment is capable of lifting spirits and/or putting you in a mood that may somehow alleviate or bring into focus whatever situation one might be going through. I can say without any hesitation or trepidation that this record, ‘The Cost’, makes me feel great, and a big part of that reason is I think it touches on a lot of shared inner emotions.

[MusicDish] Which track is the most meaningful to you? And which do you think will be your biggest hit?

[Tim Young] I go back and forth on this but today I’d have to say the title track, ‘The Cost’, is the most meaningful. I could not have written this song without the amazing relationship I share with my girlfriend. ‘The Cost’ is the worst case scenario. What if things all fell apart? Disaster. I would never want to face that, but what if? Nobody knows.

If ‘The Cost’ was to be the biggest hit… Wow. I could see that. (I think the sleeper hit could be ‘Wishing.’)

[MusicDish] On ‘Drifting Cowboy,’ can you offer some insight as to whether the cowboy is a fictional character, or if he is autobiographical at all?

[Tim Young] I suppose a combination. That word ‘cowboy’ pops up in my songs sometimes. I dig that word because it represents freedom to me. Someone with no ties; whose only possessions are a horse and whatever is in the saddle bags - the ability to just split without notice. Maybe because I’m a city dweller part of me yearns for the openness of what the West used to be - what it meant to head West.

I took the title from the name of Hank Williams’ band, The Drifting Cowboys. By the way, the details listed in the song are facts about Hank: born in Alabama, quit school in Montgomery, played in bars and on the radio, made it big in Nashville.

[MusicDish] How do you feel about the current state of the music industry? Do today’s artists compare with the legends of the past, like Elvis or Johnny? Do you have hope for the future generations of American music?

[Tim Young] I think generally the industry is healthy because there are more artists than ever working and creating new music. I believe the consensus is that the internet has leveled the playing field some. The major labels no longer have the stranglehold on the business they used to.

I still think it’s very difficult to have people pay attention to new artists and part of this is because there are more artists than ever and it’s very difficult to get through most of the muck to find something of value. This has probably always been true, but with the internet it has become so much more obvious.

Great artists are rare. I know there are some out there but I don’t want to be told who they are. Supposedly greatness rises to the surface and if that’s true then I’ll see them when they appear. Today it’s too much of what I call the ‘toothpaste effect’: one brand today, a different brand tomorrow. The music doesn’t stick; it just washes down the drain. Spit out.

Hope doesn’t cost a dime.

[MusicDish] What is the next step in your music career going to be? What can fans expect?

[Tim Young] More music! I’ve never done any kind of major touring and I would like to do that. I want to put out one album a year. Right now I’m in the middle of writing songs for the next record. I want ‘The Cost’ to make a difference in my career so that I can accomplish some of these goals more easily.

My fans can always expect the kind of emotional no holds barred shows that I always deliver, and new songs and ideas are always a part of that. Performing is a high priority.

[MusicDish] Can you speak a bit about your current performance schedule? Where can fans see you live?

[Tim Young] This is an area I need to improve. I don’t have a satisfactory performance line up. Right now I have a solo gig at the Vintage Bar, which is located on the corner of 51st Street and 9th Avenue. I perform there once a month, in about the middle of the month. The dates always change but I always post them on my site and on MySpace. Vintage is a great intimate setting and I love playing there.

My band, which is a duo, with Sand Edwards on drums, is on the lookout for gigs. I wear a lot of hats running this project and sometimes the booking agent hat has a tendency to fall off, but like all the others I pick it right up again.

http://www.timrocksweb.com

http://www.myspace.com/timnycyoung



Generation X: Natural Change Agents Becoming Our New Corporate Executives

December 20th, 2009
Pat Thornton asked:


Generation X  (born mid-l960s - late-1970s) 

This generation is also known by Americans as the Thirteenth Generation, since it is the 13th generation of the USA since 1620.  Canadian author Douglas Coupland either (it depends upon who you ask) stole the name of Billy Idol’s old punk band or saw it in an obscure sociology text for his 1991 book Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture.  This is a fictional book about three strangers who decide to distance themselves from society to get a better sense of who they are.  He describes the characters as “underem­ployed, overeducated, intensely private and unpredictable.”  Coupland insists he took his book’s title from another book Class, by Paul Fussell.  Fussell used “X” to describe a group of people who want to pull away from class, status and money in society. Because the characters in Coupland’s book fit that description, he decided on the title Generation X.  

What GenXers enjoy most is friendship, music, their sound systems,  computers and television while school, work, youth groups, and religious group involvement rank very low. Those on the top of the scale represent areas of freedom, choice and independence, while those below are structured and normally run by Boomers.   The phrase GenX was picked up by marketers desperately seeking a name for the “generation without a name.”  Of course, there’s been much wrangling about this term, and many others have been offered, not all of them complimentary.   Generation X is the most immigrant generation born in the twentieth century.  In a few years’ time, as Xers move through midlife to elderhood, they will be the pragmatic workers that get the job done, at the same time helping the aging Boomers to “get real” without losing themselves in apocalyptic visions.  Generation X will be cunning and deft in business and elsewhere, quick to seize opportunities and adapt to changing environments.  And they will be nice to be around.  

SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF GenX AT WORK  

Attitudes

Diversity Work-life balance Entrepreneurial Free agents - employability Fun at work; relationships are critical Pragmatic, skeptical & informal Information driven Music is huge; language of expression

 

Contributions

Crave performance feedback Technoliterate Empowered & independent “Grow in place” career strategy Embrace change; highly creative

 

Cautions

Impatient with meetings & process; get in, do it, move on to the next project Rebel against micro-management Job changes are necessary & normal Cynical; distrustful of institutions

 

SOME MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT GenX

Media Myth:     Materialistic.   Reality:    First generation that can expect to earn less (in real terms) than their parents.  They want out of debt, so money is important; however material wealth and status are scorned.

Media Myth:  Whiners.  Reality:    Gen Xers face huge challenges - school loans, skyrocketing real estate costs, environmental disasters, unprecedented healthcare issues, pandemics - yet most are philosophical about the problems they’re inheriting.

Media Myth:   “You owe me” attitude.   Reality:   Freedom and flexibility are their ultimate rewards. Their goal is to build a portable career. Institutions are suspect.   Media Myth:   Unwilling to work hard. Reality:   GenX believes it’s unfair to expect a 70-hour week for 40 hours of pay. They are committed to having a life beyond work. Work is a transactional arrangement - not a cause or calling.  

Media Myth:   Living on “easy street.”  Reality:   In the 1950s, young homeowners could make the monthly mortgage payment by using 14 % of their income. Today it takes 40%. GenXers worry they won’t have enough money to pay for a home and their children’s education  

SOME RESULTS OF COLLISIONS BETWEEN GenX AND OTHER GENERATIONAL GROUPS  

when a Senior (mid 1920s to mid-1940s) collides, they think …

Don’t respect experience. That noise is not music! Don’t know what hard work is.

 

when a Baby Boomer (mid l940s to mid 1960s) collides, they think …

Rude - no social skills. Always doing things their own way, instead of following procedures Slackers.

 

when a GenX (mid-1060s to late 1970s) collides, they think …

Don’t worry - Be happy! Like, w-a-a-y too intense. Information overload.

 

At no time in our history have so many and such different generations with such diversity been asked to work shoulder to shoulder, side by side, cubicle by cubicle. The once-linear nature of power at work, from older to younger, has been disrupted by changes in life expectancy and health, as well as changes in lifestyle and technology.    We are all individuals. There are countless ways we differ in background, personality, values, preferences, and style.  To make judgments about these differences (i.e., who is better), is illogical and meaningless. However, exploring generational diversity can help explain - and bridge - the sometimes-baffling differences behind our unspoken assumptions and at-odds attitudes.

 Caution: Be careful to avoid reinforcing negative stereotypes. Generational differences are a start, not an end to understanding.  

 



Create a Buzz: if you Build it They Will Come!

December 15th, 2009
Sheena Metal asked:


Building a music career is hard work. Every day, month and year you repeat the same grind: build the band, write the songs, record the songs, rehearse the songs, perform the songs, promote the band, advertise the band, solicit industry, publicize to the press, build the website, create the message boards, forums, and chat rooms, assemble the street team…it goes on and on until you think your head will surely explode from the mountains of menial tasks that face you, the unsigned artist, each day.

Still, after putting in all of that work a band will hit dry spells, slow times and glass ceilings. Some days, your already slow move forward, seems to retard even further. Sometimes it feels as though you’ve peaked and will never advance. There are even days you want to blow off all of this tedious monotony, get a job in the electronics department at Target, and call it a day!

But even as your face is smushed up against the glass ceiling of a never-changing cycle of music business grunt work, hope is just over the horizon. See, there is something that you never stopped to think about all the while you were chasing the elusive brass ring of music stardom…all of this time, you were in control. If opportunities have stopped coming your way, then make your own. If you want to be a rockstar, develop a situation you can star in and rock. You have the power and the ability to be anything and everything you have ever wanted to be if you learn to simply create your own buzz.

The following are a few tips that may help you to get started creating your own buzz in order to push past the obstacles and keeping moving down the Yellow Brick Road of musical superstardom:

1.) Create Your Own Gigs—Tired of whining that you never get the gigs you want? You know: good clubs, weekend shows, prime slots, longer sets, decent pay, good bands on the bill, press attending, industry confirming and most importantly, your band headlining. It’s ridiculous to waste time complaining, when you could be booking, planning, promoting and playing your dreams gigs right now. Sure it will be a lot of time invested and it may mean putting smaller gigs on hold for awhile in order to promote one giant show, but the payoffs will inevitably outweigh the work…and the best part is, it’s all about you. You are the promoter. You are the stars of the night. You pick the date, the times, the bands. You invite the press and the industry. Within a month or two, you could be playing the types of gigs you have always wanted, and all the while getting press, making money, collecting names for your mailing list and building hype for your band that even the stodgiest industry can take notice of.

2.) Join The Ranks Of The Press And/Or The Industry—You know what they say…if you can’t beat them, join them. If you want to get industry or press to notice you and your band, what better way than to become a member of the industry or press. Pick up a gig writing for a local magazine and review your friends’ bands and the shows you promote. Intern at a record label and meet friends in the industry to invite to your gigs. Start a management/promotion company and book your band and your friends’ bands to become better acquainted with clubs and their booking agents. You’ll find it will be much easier to deal with industry people when they consider you more of a peer and not just another band asking for help.

3.) Numbers, Numbers, Numbers—It may sound ridiculous but in the entertainment industry (as in any business), your perceived worth is tracked by your numbers. Web posters, gig patrons and listeners of your music all translate to numbers and the big ones impress fans and industry alike. If you want club bookers, managers, magazine editors and A&R to notice you then make sure your numbers are up. Web hits, fan group members, online community friends and people on your personal mailing list all add up to your bankability as a band so keep driving those numbers up and watch the doors swing open wide for you.

4.) Teach, Volunteer, Take Classes, Join Groups—If you want to meet new people, gain different opportunities, and find fresh ways to obtain your goals, then get out where people are doing what you seek and mingle. If you play and instrument, start teaching and get to know the bands of your students. If you see big events happening in your town, volunteer to work them and get to know the management, talent and audience alike. Take classes and join music organizations not only to learn but to network. There is a whole world of entertainment people out there. Get to know some of them and make those folks a part of your band’s promotional circle.

By following these tips and others soon you will find that your band is enjoying the opportunities and buzz you were only dreaming of before. Best of all, you’re now in charge of your own career and musical destiny; creating profitable situations for yourself. You are playing good shows and coming home with money in your pocket. You are selling your own product to pay for band expenses. You are filling your press kit with reviews, interviews and mentions of your band. You are meeting people and building your mailing list. You are establishing your reputation as an important member of the artistic community. No longer waiting to be thrown a chance by some industry member, you have taken command of your musical destiny and cast yourself as the star of your own show. Now, don’t you feel better?



What You Should Know About Music Business Books

December 14th, 2009
Robert B. asked:


Have you ever tried to find music business books?  Its hard, but you know how important it is to educate yourself about this part of the business.  If you are reading this article you are probably a very serious artist, producer or manager who has their head on straight.  You are probably very talented as well or you would not be taking this step. 

In my experience, if you don’t have the business end of your career under control, things are sure to fall apart at some point.  Most musicians need to spend the majority of their off stage time rehearsing, but there are some other areas that need to be dealt with.  Booking performances is important whether you do this yourself or work with an agent and it takes some of your time.  You must also promote yourself (sometimes this is the fun part of your job), and this takes a large part of your schedule.  Your time is limited, but you still need to educate yourself and if you could find some good music business books, you could study in any time you have left.

An advantage that we have these days is that there are instant downloads and templates available on the internet that will greatly reduce the time that it takes for you to get material and to educate yourself.  With all of the demands on your schedule you will appreciate the time savings.  Some products are oriented to specific areas of the business, but still contain information that is relative to other areas.

What is something that you can learn from music business books?  You can learn about how to present the music business as a normal business model.  You need to look at your business just as a normal business person looks at their business.  It is only after you do this that you will have more control over your destiny and you won’t just be dreaming about “the big deal”, you will be seriously working towards it.



Management Level Music Business Jobs

December 13th, 2009
gregory van duyse asked:


ream of one day holding a management level job in the music businesses. If that is the case, here are the different music jobs that you can choose from. Personal Manager or Agent A personal manager or agent works with an individual artist or band and basically manages every aspect of their career. This ranges from their finances, booking their gigs, and advertising and promoting them. Most personal managers will only take on one to three clients at time, depending on how large the clients are and what level the clients are at. The main job of a personal manager is to see the band or artist succeed and make it to the top of the charts. Retail Sales Management Maybe you dream of working in a music store or owning your own music store eventually. One of the best music businesses jobs in the retail industry is the management position. Your main job is to operate the music store and oversee every aspect of the store. This may include promotions, training, supervising other employees, ordering products, and customer service. Business Manager A business manager will handle all the financial affairs for an artist or band. To be a business manager you should pursue a degree in business administration, and accounting and finance. This is one type of music business jobs that will require a college degree, as you have to know how to accurately handle the business and finances. As a business manager, you will be negotiating payments, doing taxes, and handling investments. These are just a few of the many different music business jobs that are on a management level. There are other jobs, some being with music labels while others may be with advertising and public relation companies. Management level jobs do require experience and you may have to work at a lower job for several years before you can take on these management level music business jobs.

California Super Literary Agent and Publishing Power Lawyer Discusses The Changing Book Publishing Industry

December 11th, 2009
R. Sebastian Gibson asked:


The publishing world is changing rapidly. No one knows what the book publishing and book selling landscape will look like if Borders Books were to disappear or if they will be closing only a few of their stores. But Borders, which is said to control about 10-12 percent of the bookselling market, is already closing some of their stores around the country. With the worsening recession and the decline of the music bricks and mortar stores where albums and CDs once were sold prior to the purchase and download of individual songs and music sharing over the internet, Borders has reportedly seen its position in the retail of books and music seriously erode the past few years, which is good reason to start purchasing books at Borders.  No one in the industry wants to see major players disappear and one can only hope that years from now, they’ll still be around.

If you have a publishing, entertainment or literary rights legal matter, visit our website at http://www.sebastiangibsonlaw.com and call us at any of the numbers easily found on our website.

But there is also the affect on the publishing business by the “big-box” merchandisers such as Wal-mart, Target and Costco that now account for 30 percent of the book market. These stores carry a limited number of titles and reportedly sell them for below cost as a “loss leader” to attract people inside their stores. Book publishers also wholesale their books to these large merchandisers at a discount.

Independent book stores combined only account for approximately 10 percent, Barnes and Noble approximately 20 percent and Amazon the rest. With those numbers, if Borders disappears completely, book publishers have little leverage to play one bookseller off against another in order to sell more books. One can only hope that the economy turns around quickly and that Borders as well as other independent booksellers survive.

Large publishing houses have been laying off their employees as they have seen their sales decrease. While in some cases this is the result of the recession, in other cases it’s the result of bad bets by these publishing houses as to the type of books they have gambled will appeal to the general market. When a publishing house provides a large advance to an author and the book does not recoup that advance and all the other costs of publishing and distribution, the book publisher suffers a loss that can be substantial. If they make too many of these bad bets, they can go out of business.

In addition, Google has been increasing its databank of books. Google scans books and makes them available on their search engine and pays book publishers for the right to do so. There are already over seven million books already scanned by Google.

On the positive side, one can look at the increase in online reading and the flood of people coming into public libraries as a result of the recession to come away with the belief that the demand for books in the future will experience a considerable growth. Libraries can’t keep purchase enough copies of new books to satisfy their ever-growing number of patrons. On top of the increased numbers of people flooding into libraries, reading rates among Latinos and young people in general are rising rapidly.

Amazon has also seen it’s sales grow for all media products, and books in the romance category at all booksellers have recently been enjoying a 7 to possibly 10 percent growth (no one is quite sure since Bookscan, the industry tracking service, doesn’t track sales at the “big box” retailers. It’s believed that Bookscan only tracks about 70 percent of book sales as these “big box” retailers now account for 30 percent of the market.

Some book publishers, however, fear that with Kindle, Amazon may be intending some day in the not too distant future on being a vertical publishing conglomerate of it’s own, avoiding any middlemen, any publishers, and taking the entire business from acquisition to the purchaser. The future of going straight from acquisition to Kindle is already here with two recent biographies going straight to Kindle before ever being published.  Simultaneous releases, however, may turn out to be only a short term experiment that is soon forgotten.

There is also concern that if Amazon were to corner the market, they could force publishers to accept whatever they demanded, and many if not most publishers simply would no longer be able to exist. Some agents see the demise of book publishers if Amazon with their Kindle and other acquisitions in the publishing industry take over 10 to 20 percent of the book publishing market in addition to their already strong bookselling dominance online.

While Kindle is the leading product in the e-reader category and now prices it’s books at just under $10, the Sony Reader is also attracting attention and one can only suspect it won’t be long before Apple and other companies join in the competition for e-readers.  Recently, Sony joined Amazon in charging a flat price of $9.99 for books on its e-readers and lowered the prices of its newest models.

While some publishers are expressing alarm about Amazon and the effect the growing use of e-readers may have on the industry, others are less worried. Some publishers believe they will still be able to charge the same amount to Amazon which it is believed takes a loss on the books that it then sells at a lower price.  Book publishers still get approximately half of the hardcover retail list price.  Consequently, other publishers fear that eventually Amazon and Sony will become tired of losing money on the books they sell on their e-readers and demand that publishers take a discounted price for the books they wholesale to them.

While Kindle and other e-readers may in the future offer more books released simultaneously in hardcover form and on digital form, the increased availability of these books could lift sales across all forms of distribution, just as audio books did.  It is more likely, however, that with e-books selling at the discounted price of $9.99, if Amazon and Sony demand lower wholesale prices, publishers will want to delay the release of books on e-readers just as film studios delay the release of movies to DVD in order to capitalize on the higher prices for hardcover books.  This leverage is what the publishers have on their side to counter any demands by Amazon or Sony for lower wholesale pricing.

At least one publisher’s imprint is trying to work out contracts with booksellers and authors capping advances at $100,000 and reducing the number of returns pitching profit-sharing proposals to authors as the way of the future. Some independent publishers sees the future as one where eventually, books will be produced and distributed electronically for little cost.

Just as the music industry suffered under its years of transition to the current situation where individual songs are downloaded or shared and the sale of entire albums or cds will never again see sales of the magnitude of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” album, so to in the publishing world, as their world changes around them, some publishers will adapt to change, some will not, and some will die a slow or surprisingly fast death depending upon how fast e-publishing takes hold and Amazon gains market share, how quickly they adapt to the changes in the publishing industry and depending on whether they continue to make good bets or bad on what they believe the public will want to read.

While the bar may be raised for new authors to have their works accepted by mainstream publishers as these publishers become more careful in what they publish and the advances they offer new writers, there will always be independent publishers willing to take chances and able to take advantage of the opportunities offered when those mainstream publishers focus on more established authors.

One thing is clear. The industry is changing and change will come faster than most can imagine it. The other thing to remember is, books will always be with us. They may be in different forms as e-readers gain in popularity and audio books continue to be popular, but in general, new technologies tend to help an industry rather than hurt it. In this case, the new forms of distribution will probably help the book publishing industry to become more flexible and reach a wider audience than ever before.

Visit our website at http://www.sebastiangibsonlaw.com and call us if you have an entertainment, publishing or literary rights legal matter and wish to retain attorney Sebastian Gibson.

As a California publishing lawyer and literary rights attorney with knowledge of the changes taking place in the publishing industry, Sebastian Gibson provides legal services to his entertainment clients in the literary and publishing world. A California lawyer for writers and authors, Sebastian Gibson is a knowledgeable attorney in the publishing industry and experienced negotiator. Sebastian Gibson does not accept unsolicited submissions. Indeed, unsolicited submissions must unfortunately be returned unopened and certified mail submissions are regretfully refused.

Only those authors who have been unable to secure the services of a literary agent willing to represent them for a percentage of their book royalties and who have the ability to pay for attorney fees and who still wish to seek the services of Sebastian Gibson for his assistance may send an e-mail requesting such services. Writers should keep in mind, however, that hiring an attorney to perform what may amount to scores if not a hundred hours or more of an attorney’s time is a costly venture.

A return e-mail to writers seeking to hire Sebastian Gibson on this basis will provide a cost estimate for the assistance of Attorney Sebastian Gibson in editing the author’s cover letter for submission to publishers and editors, the editing or revision of any book proposals, editing of the manuscript, copying charges, materials and/or determining which agents and publishers are best suited for the author’s project. Additional attorney fees are charged for submitting the project to publishers for the sale of foreign translation rights, and submissions for television and film rights.

A power attorney or super literary agent such as Sebastian Gibson represents writers and assists them in having their manuscripts and projects bought at auctions by editors on behalf of their publishers and either for a flat fee or based on his hourly rate, will assist an author with preparation of a book proposal and its submission to publishers in the U.S. and abroad. Attorney Sebastian Gibson will also assist an author in selling foreign translation rights, dramatic film and television rights, multi-book deals, and the negotiation of all contracts and the terms such as the royalty percentages and the author’s advance.



The Cattle Call Musicals Audition and How to Deal With it

December 10th, 2009
Jeremy Fisher asked:


Each year long-running musicals are recast and new musicals are written. You want to audition for a role in these shows but you don’t have an agent, and there are thousands of singer dancer actors looking for work. How do you start?

Every year, production companies run open calls. They are particularly useful if the show is new or in an unusual genre (grunge/folk/rock or Tuvan throat singing), if there is a serious lack of actors with the relevant casting requirements (ethnic casting or tightrope juggling), or if the casting directors simply want to know what’s out there at the moment. Open calls are usually advertised in the theatre press (The Stage newspaper in the UK is an example). The open call can be quite a demoralising process (not for nothing are they called “cattle calls”), so this article will help you prepare for them.

The first thing you’ll see when you arrive is a long queue. Depending on how popular the show is, the queue could be three times round the block, or just a small crowd. Be prepared to stand in the queue for several hours. Even 15 years ago, professional singer friends of mine were kept waiting for 7 hours on the auditions for nuns in The Sound of Music.

What should you carry with you? Your resume or CV and a photograph are essential. If the photograph is not attached, make sure that both the resume and photograph have your name and contact details on. Photographs and CV details often get separated, and it would be horrible if the panel remembered your face but then couldn’t find your contact details on the photo. A bottle of water is vital, and either a book or an mp3 player is useful to while away the hours.

You will give your name to the auditions usher or stage door manager, and the audition begins. You might have only two minutes to walk onto the stage, give your name and sing your song. If you’re unlucky, you’ll have 16 bars. If you’re really unlucky, they will ask you for your best single phrase. How do you deal with this?

Remember that the purpose of this audition is NOT to get the job! If you’re up against 1,000 people or more, nothing you can do will make you stand out enough to be offered the job on the spot. Your task is to be asked back for the invited calls, the ones that follow the public cattle call. Therefore your task is to appear professional, calm and focused. That’s it.

If you look professional (dress appropriately, perform to a good standard, interact well with the panel) you will be noticed. If you seem calm you will score points too - cattle calls are difficult situations with a lot of “unknowns” - like not know what time you’re actually going to perform, and a vast number of people breathing down your neck! If you are focused, you’ll be able to sing your piece to the best of your ability, and lock into the character immediately. Being focused really “reads” well on a theater stage, so the panel will notice very quickly how well you do.

When I’m coaching for the 16bar audition, the key is practise EVERYTHING. The walk in, the hello, the piece announcement, giving the pianist the music (or the backing track), the getting into focus, the 16 bars (decided beforehand, please!), and the exit. Everything is important, even the way you interact with the auditions secretary. I work to help you choose song extracts that show your best (and it’s not necessarily your loudest or highest), and to sing those extracts to the best of your ability.

Notice I haven’t said what you should sing! Ultimately, in a cattle call your choice of song is less important than how you sing it. I have been on cattle calls where actors singing the weirdest songs have been called back for the next audition, simply because they sang it really well. In a situation like this you want to stack the dice in your favour as much as possible. Take a piece you know really well - that way if nerves strike, and you will still feel secure in your song.

Panels find cattle calls just as horrible as you do, and believe me, they breathe a sigh of relief when someone professional, calm and focused turns up. Normally there are 3 heaps on the casting panel’s desk. Yes, No, Maybe. The only pile you want to be in is the Yes pile.

And if you give a clear, focused, professional performance and follow the rules in this article, you’re much more likely to get to sing in the next round and stay in the Yes pile.



Management Level Music Business Jobs

December 9th, 2009
Paul Shellem asked:


You may dream of one day holding a management level job in the music businesses. If that is the case, here are the different music jobs that you can choose from.

Personal Manager or Agent

A personal manager or agent works with an individual artist or band and basically manages every aspect of their career. This ranges from their finances, booking their gigs, and advertising and promoting them. Most personal managers will only take on one to three clients at time, depending on how large the clients are and what level the clients are at. The main job of a personal manager is to see the band or artist succeed and make it to the top of the charts.

Retail Sales Management

Maybe you dream of working in a music store or owning your own music store eventually. One of the best music businesses jobs in the retail industry is the management position. Your main job is to operate the music store and oversee every aspect of the store. This may include promotions, training, supervising other employees, ordering products, and customer service.

Business Manager

A business manager will handle all the financial affairs for an artist or band. To be a business manager you should pursue a degree in business administration, and accounting and finance. This is one type of music business jobs that will require a college degree, as you have to know how to accurately handle the business and finances. As a business manager, you will be negotiating payments, doing taxes, and handling investments.

These are just a few of the many different music business jobs that are on a management level. There are other jobs, some being with music labels while others may be with advertising and public relation companies. Management level jobs do require experience and you may have to work at a lower job for several years before you can take on these management level music business jobs.

For More Details Visit: http://www.music-career-help.com/